Part 3 – Assignment 3: Re-appropriating Images – Notes 2

  • Also reflect on where the original is currently located. Where did you access it?

The original is currently back at it’s 90 year home of the Art Institute of Chicago. The last time it was somewhere else, was a 3 month stint at New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art.

I was able to see it online.

  • Did you see the original or have you seen a reproduction in print, online or  elsewhere?

I have not seen the original. I have seen it in various art books over the years, but in this instance, I have online viewed … Read the rest

Part 3 – Assignment 3: Re-appropriating Images – Notes 1

  • Look at the original image and do a semiotic analysis. Describe its contents (denotation) and possible meanings (connotation) as you did in Part Three.

We are asked to look at the image and do a semiotic analysis, so I will start with the denotation, or the literal description.

The painting shows a rather bald man wearing glasses and holding a pitch fork, with a blonde woman next to him. Both of them are stood in front of a house, with a red building off the the right of the painting.

The man is facing front with his eyes focused … Read the rest

Part 3 – Assignment 3: Re-appropriating Images – Research

Identify an example of re-appropriation within visual communication. As the Botero example suggests, this could be illustrators or designers drawing from wider visual culture within their work, advertisers using ideas from films, the satirical reuse of media images for political ends, or the reuse of text and image within collage. The reuse could be within visual communication, such as designers re-purposing typography, illustrations or iconic designs, or examples where visual communicators have taken ideas from wider, perhaps global, visual cultures.

First, some definitions from Merriam-Webster:

appropriate
verb

ap·​pro·​pri·​ate | \ə-ˈprō-prē-ˌāt\
appropriated; appropriating
transitive verb

1 : to take exclusive Read the rest

Part 3 – Project 4: Exercise 4 – Cutting Edge

Explore a range of websites or other forms of new media (games, video, other interactive media, etc.) and identify examples of what you would consider cutting edge or inventive forms of visual communication. You could conduct your search in terms of the aesthetics used, the functionality of the site, or simply the ideas being explored. Pick examples that you find intriguing, exciting or novel and reflect on what makes them interesting to you. Think back to Project 1 and see if these examples still conform to messages that persuade, inform, or entertain.

The first really interesting website I came across … Read the rest

Part 3 – Project 4: Exercise 3 – Visual Conventions for Time and Place

  • Find examples of different visual conventions used to convey time and/or place/ space – frame-by-frame storytelling, handling of perspective, use of speech bubbles, etc. – from different historical periods. Use this exercise to develop your research skills by accessing the online image libraries available to you at OCA, conducting internet image searches, or accessing your local library.

Think carefully about the key terms you’ll use to describe what you’re looking for. You’ll find sequential images in cartoons, graphic novels or murals, to give just a few examples, and you’ll see them described as frame-by-frame, cartoon strips, visual stories, etc. Any Read the rest

Project 4 Time and Place: Exercise 1 – The Next Big Thing

This assignment asks us to choose an example of contemporary visual communication, so I’ve picked the below ‘The New Yorker’ cover by Olimpia Zagnoli.

• What characterises it as ‘new’? How does it fit within wider contemporary trends?

Some of the features that strike me as being ‘new’ are:

  • The bright, contrasting, colour– block effect
  • The ‘digital art’ style of the illustration
  • Simple, curved shapes
  • Fun and quirky

Olimpia’s designs are very illustrative of many contemporary illustration trends, infact, her work is featured as an example in many ‘2019 design trend’ articles online such as this one from Creative Bloq.… Read the rest

Project 3: Exercise 1 – What Does This Apple Mean?

Using existing images of apples as a starting point, think about what the image of an apple could represent or signify, placing recognisable images in contrast to others, in order to generate new meanings, or to reveal critique or satirise existing images and the ideas represented in those images in some way.

Select apple images from art history or from commercial visual communication. Try to use different visual examples or signifiers to explore different meanings in different contexts. For example an apple in a religious painting is likely to mean something very different from an apple in a TV advert.Read the rest

Project 2: Crop Circles

This little research question asks us to ‘write down the Signifier and the Signified of such images.’ and to ‘Take note of the places where these phenomena are formed and their relationship to the land.’

As a reminder, the signifier is the form a sign takes, and the signified is the concept that the sign represents.

The signifier here is the crop circles themselves. There are two concepts signified by them. The first is the concept of art, such as in the case of Rob Dickinson, who is talked about in the Places () excerpt. The circles he and his … Read the rest

Project 2 – Exercise 3: Film Posters

Choose a film and its corresponding poster and reflect on how the typography, image, colour and composition are used to reflect the nature of the film. You may want to choose a film you’ve seen or can view some clips from; alternatively, you could start from the poster and then research around the film. How has the aesthetic of the moving image influenced the design of the poster?

I thought this poster for the documentary film ‘Terms and Conditions May Apply’ really stood out.

Without knowing a thing about this film, I recognised the typography as being the typefaces and … Read the rest

Part 3 – Visual Communications. Project 1: Exercise 1

Designing Messages

The first part of this task involves finding a few examples of the 6 types of communication talked about in this section.

1. Persuasion

The first example below is an advert for the fast food chain Burger King. Apart from their logo, the only other text on the ad is a small line reading ‘It Just Tastes Better’.

The ad relies on the fact that consumers already know something about Burger King, as no information about their products is supplied. More importantly, it assumes that viewers will recognise the partly-disguised figure of Ronald McDonald – McDonalds’ longtime mascot.… Read the rest