Part 2 – Project 2: Exercise 2

Can you think of any more examples of character archetypes? Have a think about it and then do some research to see if you’re on the right lines and to find out more.

From the previous section, we are already told about the mentor, sidekick, and shapeshifter.

My list also contained the hero, villain, protector, love interest, and the fool/idiot/comedy character.

In ‘The Writer’s Journey’, Vogler details ‘The Most Common and Useful Archetypes’ as:

Hero: The protagonist, or central character.
Mentor: Provides motivation, insights, and training for the hero. Helps alleviate doubts and fears. In a story, the … Read the rest

Part 2 – Project 1: Exercise 1

The first exercise follows on from the ideas of ‘the arbitrariness of the sign’ and ‘the textual revolution and the story’:

What happens to a story when you take it from its source, make it permanent in print, and disseminate it to a wide audience?

  • When a story is printed, it reaches a lot more people than it would when told orally. It stops evolving too. No longer does it change with each re-telling. That particular story is set in stone (or ink), unless it is re-written by someone else.
  • Printing of stories can have negative implications – misinformation and
Read the rest