Part 3 – Project 4: Exercise 3 – Visual Conventions for Time and Place

  • Find examples of different visual conventions used to convey time and/or place/ space – frame-by-frame storytelling, handling of perspective, use of speech bubbles, etc. – from different historical periods. Use this exercise to develop your research skills by accessing the online image libraries available to you at OCA, conducting internet image searches, or accessing your local library.

Think carefully about the key terms you’ll use to describe what you’re looking for. You’ll find sequential images in cartoons, graphic novels or murals, to give just a few examples, and you’ll see them described as frame-by-frame, cartoon strips, visual stories, etc. Any Read the rest

Part 3 – Project 4: Exercise 2 – Knitting Patterns

Your view of knitting will be shaped both by your own experience of it – as a knitter, a wearer of knitted items or friend or relative of someone who knits – and through visual representations of knitting as an activity.

• To start with, produce a quick mind map of what knitting means to you and
what you associate with it.

• Do some visual research by finding contemporary and historical examples of
where and how knitting or knitted items have been represented, for example
pattern books, humorous cards based on 1950s patterns for knitted tank
tops, balaclavas, etc., … Read the rest

Part 2 – Project 4: Exercise 2

We are asked to read the extract from ‘The Road’ again – as many times as we feel you need to – and to think carefully about the following and make some notes:

  • ‘He’, the man, and ‘the boy’ are nameless. Why? Does their anonymity change the way we feel about the characters? Can we still care about them without names? Do they still have an identity without a name?

There are various reasons the characters are nameless. One could be that, without names, we as readers can’t project any of our own biases onto them. For instance, if they … Read the rest

Part 2 – Project 4: Exercise 1

Project 4 starts by giving us an extract from The Road by Cormac McCarthy and asks us to re-write a few lines of the extract using different types of narrator:

• First person narrator – from the point of view of the man (I pushed the cart…)

“I pushed the cart and both me and the boy carried knapsacks. In the knapsacks were essential things in case we had to abandon the cart and make a run for it. Clamped to the handle of the cart was a chrome motorcycle mirror that I used to watch the road behind us. … Read the rest