Part 3 – Assignment 3: Re-appropriating Images – Notes 2

  • Also reflect on where the original is currently located. Where did you access it?

The original is currently back at it’s 90 year home of the Art Institute of Chicago. The last time it was somewhere else, was a 3 month stint at New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art.

I was able to see it online.

  • Did you see the original or have you seen a reproduction in print, online or  elsewhere?

I have not seen the original. I have seen it in various art books over the years, but in this instance, I have online viewed … Read the rest

Part 3 – Assignment 3: Re-appropriating Images – Notes 1

  • Look at the original image and do a semiotic analysis. Describe its contents (denotation) and possible meanings (connotation) as you did in Part Three.

We are asked to look at the image and do a semiotic analysis, so I will start with the denotation, or the literal description.

The painting shows a rather bald man wearing glasses and holding a pitch fork, with a blonde woman next to him. Both of them are stood in front of a house, with a red building off the the right of the painting.

The man is facing front with his eyes focused … Read the rest

Part 3 – Assignment 3: Re-appropriating Images – Research

Identify an example of re-appropriation within visual communication. As the Botero example suggests, this could be illustrators or designers drawing from wider visual culture within their work, advertisers using ideas from films, the satirical reuse of media images for political ends, or the reuse of text and image within collage. The reuse could be within visual communication, such as designers re-purposing typography, illustrations or iconic designs, or examples where visual communicators have taken ideas from wider, perhaps global, visual cultures.

First, some definitions from Merriam-Webster:

appropriate
verb

ap·​pro·​pri·​ate | \ə-ˈprō-prē-ˌāt\
appropriated; appropriating
transitive verb

1 : to take exclusive Read the rest